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  • Wednesday, April 10, 2019 3:48 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Gate Pose

    with Sheryl Wolover


    The unusual shape of Gate Pose invites us to open our view of who we are and where we are going.





    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl ~ yogalegends.com

  • Friday, April 05, 2019 7:49 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Nutritious Whole Grains

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    Many people of traditional cultures naturally understood which foods were healthy and nutritious. Modern people, however, have to consult charts and nutritional tables to learn if a food is healthful. (Detailed research and charts are readily available on line.) Grains are an example of a food that is well represented in all the vital nutrient groups: vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, oils and fibers. These nutrients come in a very balanced proportion to each other. This balanced nutritional content is one reason why people, who have adjusted to a diet including grains, seldom feel cravings for something missing. With a few added condiments such as healthy oils and fats, and fermented foods much of human nutritional needs are supplied by these lovely grains. Below is a highlight of a few of the essential nutrients in grains.

      The vitamins in grains are many. Dependent on growing methods and geography, grains contain several essential B vitamins; B1, B2, and B6. Vitamin E is also found in all grains as well as vitamin K1.

      The mineral and trace elements in grains support the digestion and assimilation of the other nutrients in the grain. Grains are a good source of organic silica as well(especially abundant in millet).  Many of these minerals and trace elements assist in especially healthy brain function, nervous system, and in the building process of healthy bones, muscles, skin, hair, and nails. Thus grains are a natural beauty aids.

      The oils supplied by grains are unsaturated and contain many "essential " oils that are necessary for the body. Linolic fatty acids are some of them, which among other benefits, prevents cholesterol build up, and break up fats.

      Proteins are also present in grains. As the matter of facts, grains are an excellent source of protein, containing 1/2- 2/3 as much as that which is provided in the same amount of meat and fowl. In a meat centered diet however, when a high proportion of the body's caloric intake is supplied simply by proteins, an acidic condition can be created in the blood. When this happens, the body drains its own mineral supply in an attempt to neutralize these acids.

      The carbohydrates provided by grains are what scientists call polysaccharides. These are complex chains of sugar molecules and easily digested when chewed well, releasing a steady stream of carbohydrates that provides a stable energy flow. Quick burning carbohydrates on the other hand, such as sugar, and other sweets, enter the bloodstream in a rush and puts strain on the liver, pancreas, heart, and other organs. They also produce highs and lows that become mood swings.

      The bran is an important part of the grains as well. It is a shame that when making rice "white", or turning wheat into white flour, this valuable substance is removed. Most of grains' vitamins and minerals are stored in and under the protective coating of bran, and so are lost with its removal. Much of the protein in wheat is also taken away, because this is attracted to the bran and germ. Additionally, bran contains enzymes, that aid in the digestion of the grain, and absorbs excess bile. It also acts as a roughage that keeps the intestines regular and functioning well.

    Whole grains can maintain their nutritive components over a long period of time. Once the bran has been removed, as with white rice or white flour, it looses most of its nutrients. In its whole state, grains are naturally sealed so perfectly, that grains are still capable of sprouting into new life years after their harvest. Whole grain not only provides us with an excellent form of nourishment, but also with the potential of life creating forces.


    GOMAKU RICE

    3 c short grain brown rice
    1 table spoon  lemon juice           

    Kernels from 1 corn on the cob
    1  6" piece kombu sea vegetables           

    1/2 lb tempeh, or chicken
    4 c water                  

    1/4 tsp sea salt
    1 carrot, diced                   

    Butter, olive or coconut oil
    2 onions, diced

    Wash the rice and place it in a pot with the water and lemon juice. Let it soak for 6-8 hours.
    Bring the rice to a boil. Soak the kombu for 2 min, and cut it in cubes. Cube the tempeh or chicken and fry the cubes in butter or oil until golden. When the rice has come to a boil add the kombu, carrots, corn, onions, tempeh and salt. Cover with a lid and let it simmer for 60 min. Let the rice sit for 5 min before placing it in a serving bowl. Garnished with finely cut parsley, gomaku rice is a little colorful meal by itself and can be served as it is with a few pieces of pickles.

    *Variation: Use rice and other grains together, beans, or beef instead of tempeh. Use different vegetables,  mushrooms etc. The rice can be pressure cooked for 40 min, instead of being boiled.





    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.




    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.



    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


  • Monday, March 18, 2019 3:00 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Blackberry
    Excerpt from "A City Herbal"

    by Maida Silverman



    Part Two ...



    Historical Lore, Legends, and Uses: The word bramble is said to be derived from the Old English word brymble, meaning prickly, and bramble can also mean any thorny bush. Another source explains the word as coming from the Anglo-Saxon the ART of KATYA SANNAword bramel, itself derived from an older word, brom, meaning broom. In earlier times, the thorny branches of the Blackberry tied to a stick were used to make a broom for sweeping. In England, the word bramble is used as a verb; the expression going brambling means going Blackberry picking.

    The Blackberry has long been appreciated for the taste of the ripe fruit and valued for its medicinal properties. Many writers did not even bother with a botanical description of the plant, saying instead that it is so well known it needs no description, or it grows in almost every hedge. It is difficult to overestimate the faith people once had in the healing powers of this plant. The astringent and binding properties were familiar to all who wrote about Blackberries and all parts of the plant leaves, roots, flowers, and ripe and unripe berries were used.

    Preparations containing Blackberry were used to treat diarrhea, dysentery (often called bloody flux ), various stomach disorders, and were believed valuable for healing irritations of the mouth and throat. Eating young shoots was even credited with fastening loose teeth in the gums! Infusions of the roots and leaves and syrups prepared from the berries added to wine were the usual methods of administering.

    The Leechbook of Bald, a tenth-century Anglo-Saxon treatise on plants and herbal remedies, recommended preparations of Blackberry. For flux in women a tea was made from the berries and drunk for three days while fasting. For heart-ache the fresh leaves were pounded and laid over on the wound.

    One Tudor herbalist recommended taking Blackberry juice mixed with wine and honey for the passions of the heart. He observed, The sweet ripe fruit is very effectual, besides the facility and pleasantness in taking. Another herbalist, Dr. William Coles, prescribed Blackberry as a remedy for heartburn, as some call it, which is a gnawing in the stomach from choler. ( Choler is an old word meaning anger. This particular write was apparently aware of the connection between emotions like anger and physical illness, especially stomach and digestive disorders. He noted that the distilled water of {Blackberry} branches, leaves, flowers and fruit is very pleasant in both taste and smell and is excellent for feverish persons.

    At the end of his extensive treatise on the virtues of Blackberry, Dr. Coles decided to include the following homily: The people of Norway use their bramble against scurvy and other melancholy diseases, so that we may admire the wonderful wisdom of God, who has ordained to grow in every climate remedies for those diseases whereunto it is subject. The doctor was no doubt rebuking his fellow Englishmen and women, who at that time were abandoning their native medicines in favor of foreign imported herbs, which he believed were greatly inferior.

    The young roots and the root bark of the older plants were most favored for medicinal use. These contained the greatest amounts of valuable tannic, malic, and citric acids, and thus produced the strongest tonic and astringent effect.

    The dried or green leaves were used to prepare gargles and heal sores and irritations of the mouth and genitals. One seventeenth-century writer states that the powdered leaves strewn on running sores heals them. A decoction of the leaves was also valuable for treating stomach upsets and womens ailments. And infusion of the unripe berries was highly esteemed for curing vomiting and loose bowels. A wash for the hair (the leaves boiled in lye!) cured head sores and made the hair black.

    Home remedies for the digestive ailment that frequently resulted from drinking unwholesome milk or water and eating tainted meats were kept on hand until well into the twentieth century, and this is still done in rural areas.the ART of KATYA SANNA Every kitchen has a supply of dried Blackberry leaves, roots, and berries on hand, as well as Blackberry jam, cordial, and syrup. The Pennsylvania Dutch used the leaves, roots, and fruit to ease indigestion, and preparations of the root were valued for treating diarrhea.

    In China, several varieties of Blackberry were described and employed medicinally. The Chinese believed the fruit strengthens the virile powers and increases the yin principle, in addition to giving vigor to the whole body. Preparations of the young shoots were used to improve the complexion and treat colds and fevers.

    Blackberry was a familiar medicinal plant to native Americans. The Cherokee Indians chewed the root to ease coughs and used cold poultices to relieve hemorrhoids. Delaware Indians made a tea from the roots, which they used to cure dysentery, and the Oneida, Catawba, and other tribes were familiar with the root and used it for similar diseases.

    At one time, Blackberry root was an official drug listed in the United States Dispensatory. A fluid extract for treating diarrhea was listed as recently as 1955.


    ~ From the Recipe Box - Blackberry Vinegar ~



    alt

    Paperback by Maida Silverman. 192 pp. The wild plants of the city are potent herbal medicines and nutritious wild edibles, as well as sources of comfort, fiber, and dyes. Learn to recognize and use 34 of them.
  • Friday, March 15, 2019 6:07 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Deep Roots: Pickled Burdock
    With Linda Conroy of Moonwise Herbs
    www.moonwiseherbs.com
    www.midwestwomensherbal.com

    Burdock (Arctium sp) is one of the most nourishing herbs on the planet. It’s long tap root reaches deep into the soil and pulls up minerals, storing them in it’s roots. These nutrients are then rendered bio available to our bodies once we ingest them. Western herbalists consider burdock to be a blood “cleanser” and I like to be more clear in that it nourishes the liver, which supports our bodies with elimination. Burdock also nourishes the blood, it does not deplete as the wording “cleanser” insinuates. It actually, deeply nourishes and replenishes while also assisting the liver in functioning more effectively. In doing this burdock is known for it’s ability to clear skin conditions, from eczema to acne.    So you can see that ingesting these pickles can nourish the body in very deep and long lasting ways.

    As for harvesting, we harvest burdock root in the late fall, just before the ground freezes. The roots contain the most nutrients, at that time, as the plant has stored them for it’s own winter nourishment. You can also purchase burdock root in asian grocery stores as well as health food stores. Burdock is a biennial (a plant with a two year life cycle) and like many plants with a two year life cycle, the root is harvested in the fall of the first year. When harvested at this time of the year the root is a tender vegetable. In Japan burdock is known as gobo and is considered a staple vegetable. When prepared properly it is tender and delicious. I love to pickle the roots and to eat them as part of my daily nourishment, particularly during the winter months. I learned to make these pickles from one of my first herb teachers, Eaglesong Gardner. I am ever grateful, as many years later we still make these with our own twists to the recipe. I like to make one or two gallons which will last through the winter months.



    Making Burdock Pickles

    1. Slice burdock roots. Can be in strips or coins, but which ever style you choose it

    is ideal to slice them evenly


    2. Place sliced roots in a steaming basket and into a pot. Add a small amount of water to the bottom. Steam for 5-10 minutes.


    3. While the roots are steaming slice a small amount of garlic and ginger.  Wild leeks, wild ginger and turmeric can be added as well. Place garlic and ginger in a proper size jar for the amount of root that you have. I use quarts or 1/2 gallons.


    4. .  Prepare the brine. The brine consists of:

    -1 part cider vinegar (I like to use raw, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar)

     -1 part tamari or shoyu (both fermented soy products)

     -1 part steamed burdock water.


    5..   When roots are steamed, pack into jars. Once roots cool down, pour the brine over them. I like to have everything cool, so that the beneficial bacteria in the vinegar and the tamari renders these a fermented food product, beneficial to the digestive system.


    *burdock contains inulin, which is a prebiotic substance, also beneficial to the digestive system.

     

    6.I like to leave these on the counter for a day or two, until the flavors meld. Then I place them in the refrigerator. They can be stored there indefinitely.

     

     

    7.We like to nourish our bodies by eating a couple of pickles a day.

     

    We hope you enjoy these as much as we do! 




     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.


  • Tuesday, March 05, 2019 5:23 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    SAUERKRAUT SAUCE

    ...from the kitchen of Marie Summerwood 

    Menopausal women love this one!


    • 1 medium onion, chopped
    • 1 TB olive oil
    • 8-10 oz drained sauerkraut, reserving liquid
    • 1 tsp dill seed
    • 1/4 c. roasted brown sesame seeds
    • roasted sesame oil to taste


    Heat olive oil in a heavy skillet and saute onion until translucent. Add the drained sauerkraut and the dill seed. Saute another 5 minutes until the sauerkraut is nicely coated with the oil. Add the liquid and simmer 7 minutes or so. Blend half until smooth and mix with the unblended part to make a thicker sauce. Add the roasted sesame seeds and season with the roasted sesame oil to taste. Great on cooked greens or beans. Delicious on salad with bread and cheese. 

  • Tuesday, March 05, 2019 4:04 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Pick a Card for the Pisces New Moon
    by Kathy Crabbe

    Here we go!
    Relax your breath.
    Go within.
    Ask a question (or not)
    and pick a card.
    Then scroll down for the REVEAL.

    Oracle decks pictured below: Elfin Ally Oracle  & Lefty Oracle

     



    Pisces New Moon Card REVEAL

    Card 1: Owl Magick
    Keyword: Magick
    Meaning: You're on a spiritual mission so trust the Moon to guide you.
    Reversed: You're stuck and at a standstill with an important decision to make.

    Card 2: Crazy Janice dancing as fast as she can
    If this card appears in a reading anything could happen! Things are going fast and so are you. Is it time to slow down yet? Can you manage it? Breathe...repeat. This too shall pass.

    In my own life I have been on this sort of rollercoaster life ride before, especially during the early stages of menopause which also occurred during my astrological mid life transition. It's called Uranus Opposition and it occurs for all of us around the age of forty. It was a ride I could NOT seem to get off! Crazee indeed. But I survived and even though I knew it was going to happen all I could do was to hang on. Sorry, no great advice to offer you, other than to get ready!

    Card 3: Flamingo
    Keyword: Delight
    Meaning: Let your soul's delight out to play for today your wish is granted.
    Reversed: Keeping delight to yourself could stifle you.

    Card 4: I call wrinkles 'god-points' and so far I'm winning
    It's time to accept who you are in this very moment; no matter your age, weight, health, clothes, hair or yes, even wrinkles! You know, of course, that you are perfect in every way, right? If you or someone you're close to is feeling 'old' and negative about wrinkles please remind them that they or that you ARE winning – you are alive.

    In my own life I do the best I can to celebrate my grey hair and even my wrinkles which does require some chutzpah 'cause it goes entirely against the youth culture we worship. I am not 'old' and I forget sometimes that I have wrinkles. But I have learned a thing or two along the way and I honour the wisdom that comes with aging. If we are open to receiving this knowledge and honouring our age by being honest about it, instead of hiding, distorting or carving up our bodies to fit an ideal we don't believe in, then we are indeed wise souls that have learned a thing or two.
     
    The  Elfin Ally Oracle  & Lefty Oracle decks were used in this reading.




    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman University so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.
  • Wednesday, February 27, 2019 11:24 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Seasons, Cycles and Rhythms of Plants

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt




    When I taught the natural sciences in the middle grades of the Waldorf School, I was given no formula or textbook to follow. Rather I was asked to develop the pedagogical curriculum out of an understanding of the human being as body, soul and spirit. Philosopher, scientist and artist Rudolf Steiner offered the guidelines for this understanding of the human being, called anthroposophy. It was my job as a teacher to develop lessons that I had worked through myself, lessons that would strengthen the students’ capacities for objectivity, enliven their thinking, deepen their interest in the world and be relevant and meaningful in life. I found great assistance in Goethe’s scientific works grounded in practicality. He suggested that reality can be grasped through clear imaginative thinking and accurate objective perception. Although not commonly known today, his methods led to completely new insights into nature and the world of plants. Goethe was the first scientist to suggest an archetypal life cycle of plants – what we have come to know as the development, gestures and forms typical of most plants.

    Before we take a look at the growth processes of the archetypal plant let us place it in connection to the seasonal rhythms. In the temperate regions the entire plant covering of the earth breathes rhythmically between the summer activity of growth and blossoming and the winter activity of decaying and rest. This activity resembles the waking and sleeping activity of animals and human beings, except that the plant covering is always awake one half of the year in one hemisphere and asleep the other half. The conditions of ‘waking and sleeping’ move around the earth spatially.  Just as the sun at daybreak calls us away from sleep, so does the sun lure out the plant covering of the earth in the spring and summer. Although each plant awakens at different times throughout the year and has a definite rhythm of its own, we can through keen observation, experience a clear life cycle universal for all plants related to the cycle of the year.

    When we plant a tiny seed of leaf lettuce in the moist soil we can observe how the leaves slowly begin to grow. They spiral outward and up, ascending, and at the same time reach horizontally towards the light. The plant is all growth and expansion until the forming of the buds from where the delicate, white or yellow blossoms appear. Within the flowering blossoms begin the condensing, descending forces and inward growth processes of reproduction. The fruits develop in the heart of the flowers protecting the very condensed mature seeds. The plant withers and the seeds drop to the ground for the cycle to start over.

    Such a life cycle of expansion and contraction, known as the life cycle of the archetypal plant, is typical of most plants. It is like an idea or a spiritual reality or 'being' that manifests in a plant through growth and decay. Much like an idea – that begins as a thought and then later is realized in the physical world – the spiritual reality or 'being' expresses itself in physical matter and becomes perceptible to our senses. As the plant withers and fades away, leaving nothing but the seeds, this spiritual reality, or 'being' of the plant withdraws into the cosmic realm….

    The part of the world where I live is covered by snow. The growth forces are visible only on the frost bitten windows revealing beautiful ice pictures, a hidden promise of Spring follows winter. This year I am experimenting with growing an 'indoor garden' on my window sill. Not really 'in season'  but wonderful to eat something really fresh as a complement to a hardy soup.


    Venison and Vegetable Soup with Sage

    The cold weather in the north calls for warming soups. Venison can be substituted with any meat, fish or fried tempeh/tofu. This soup is light compared to bean soups and stews. It complements the more substantial grains or wholesome bread accompanying the soup.

    2-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or butter
    1 pound of venison thinly sliced
    1 leek cut in fine diagonals
    2 cloves garlic minced
    1 carrot diced
    1 celery stalk diced
    1/2 tablespoon dried sage
    1/2 tablespoon dried thyme
    1 bay leaf
    1 quart soup stock/broth
    1/2 - 1 tablespoon sea salt
    Dashes of pepper
    2 tablespoons parsley chopped fine for garnish


    Heat a large soup pot, and then add oil to sauté meat until lightly browned. Add leeks and garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Then add carrots and celery and sauté for 1 minute.

    Place the sage, thyme and bay leaf in cheesecloth, or cotton tea bag. Add bag to vegetables with the soup stock. Cover the pot and bring it to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 6-10 minutes.

    Remove the herbal sachet. Season the soup with salt and pepper. Simmer for a few minutes.

    Serve hot, garnished with parsley.



    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.





    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.





    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
  • Thursday, February 21, 2019 7:39 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Bread Kneader: Nourishment from the Lady

    By Linda Conroy

    www.midwestwomensherbal.com




    A couple of years ago I witnessed a woman express irritation at being called a lady. She was reacting to the idea of being considered an aristocrat and elitist connotations she was prescribing to the term. I realized that I don’t find the term offensive and I find language fascinating. I know that in different eras, words have different meanings. I often find language fascinating, so I decided to do some research on the origins of the word. Following my curiosity and a hunch, I was delighted by what I discovered.


    What I found is that the word comes from the old English word hlaefdige. The first part of the word which is a derivation of hlaf meaningloaf, bread. The second part is from the root dig=, to knead. So we can say that a lady is she who kneads bread. The connotations at the time delineated the role of the lady to nourish her household.


    While it is true that lady became a term for women of nobility, clearly the origins stem from that of a woman who nourishes her family by baking bread. As a woman who devotes her life to nourishing my family and community by baking bread and preparing whole and wild food meals as well as offering a wide spectrum of opportunities to gather and learn, I do not take offense to being addressed as a lady. I have come to embrace the term and smile when I hear it. I smile because I hear a celebration of myself as a bread kneader.


    In celebration of all of the current and future bread kneaders, I am delighted to share the following instructions and recipes for baking sour dough bread. I focus on sourdough bread, as I appreciate the fermentation process. This process produces a bread that has been leavened for a long period of time and renders it more digestible.


    Catching Yeast:

    The first step in making sourdough bread it to catch yeast. There are a variety of ways to catch yeast. My preference is to catch yeast from the surface of wild grapes, which grown abundantly around me. I replenish my starter every year, even though it is probably not necessary, but I enjoy the process of catching yeast.

    1. To catch yeast from grapes and other fruit: Place a bunch of grapes or other fruit (I have made a nice starter from blueberries that I purchased from my local food coop) in a bowl. Mix in equal amounts of flour and water. I start with a cup of each, but equal proportions are more important. Mix them together and cover, place in a location where the temperatures are at least 68 degrees F. Every day for 3-5 days add equal amounts of flour and water, until the mixture is bubbly and has a mild sour smell. Strain the grapes out of the mixture with a strainer, using a spoon to push the mixture through the strainer. You know have a starter that you can use to bake bread. You will need to continue feeding your starter, see below for feeding instructions.


    2. To catch yeast from the environment: Wild yeast lives everywhere. You can capture it from the air and from the flour itself. Simply place equal amounts of flour and water in a bowl. Cover the bowl and leave it in a place where the average temperature is at least 68 degrees F. Add equal amounts of flour and water everyday for 3-5 days, until the mixture is bubbly and has a mild sour smell. You know have a starter that you can use to bake bread. You will need to continue feeding your starter, see below for feeding instructions.


    3. To catch yeast from another person: Some people are fortunate enough to have a culture passed on through their family. If you do not have this option, you can find a friend who has a starter that they will share with you, you can purchase starters on the internet and at some natural health food stores. There are many starters and trying different starters can fun. I have had several going at the same time. It is fun to experiment.


    Feeding Your Wild Yeast Starter:

    Feeding our starter fresh flour on a regular basis, provides it with the carbohydrates necessary for it to thrive. The yeast need sugar and the flour is the source. Feeding the starter weekly is ideal. If you are baking once a week or bi-weekly you can feed it once you remove the amount you need for your recipe. Starters can be stored in the refrigerator between uses. If you bake every 2-3 days you can feed the starter and leave it out of the refrigerator.


    To feed your starter, place the starter in a jar or a crock. If you are planning to bake add equal amounts of flour and water (it is ideal to do this by weight, but if you do not have a scale you can use a measuring cup), the starter should be the consistency of a thick soup. Do this for 2-3 days prior to baking bread.


    If you are simply feeding it to keep it active, you will want it to be a little thicker, like a thick dough. This can be stored outside of the refrigerator for up to a week. If you are not going to bake with it, place it in the refrigerator after a week.


    * Generally, the amount you feed your sourdough starter depends on how much of it you have to start with. I typically double the amount of starter each time I feed it. Keep in mind that if you have more starter than you need you can pass it on or you can feed small amounts of flour and water just to maintain it until you need more. You can also make sourdough crackers, pancakes or other baked goods.


    * To store your starter for long periods of time, you can either dry (simply smear it on a dehydrator tray and dry on a setting below 100F) or you can place it in a small jar (4 or 8 oz) and freeze it.



    Quick Sourdough Bread Recipe


    (makes two loaves and makes a light bread, that is agreeable even to those who are not used to whole grain breads)


    Combine:

    1-1 1/2 cups of starter

    5 cups flour

    4 cups of warm water
    stir and let sit overnight (or for at least 8 hours)


    Always remember this step! In the morning take 1 1/2 cups for your starter.


    To the flour mixture:

    Add 5-6 more cups of flour

    Add 1 TBS salt (to be adjusted to your taste, as you make more bread)

    ¼ cup of olive oil

    Mix and knead for 10-15 minutes

    Grease two baking pans (I alternate between loaf and round pans)

    Place loaves into the pan and rise for 2-3 hours (the bread should increase in size)

    For moist bread place a pan of water in the oven during baking.

    Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes


    (this is a basic recipe, you can add a whole array of ingredients to enhance this bread, i.e. sun flower seeds, other grains, berries, fruits, honey, spices, herbs etc. Be creative!)



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    www.moonwiseherbs.com



    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Tuesday, February 12, 2019 2:22 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Orangutan energy for the office blues
    with Sheryl Wolover

    Stretch, Breath, Reach and Swing out of the "office" position. Be sure to watch the video clip of the Orangutan at the end of the Yoga practice.





    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl ~ yogalegends.com

  • Monday, February 04, 2019 12:18 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Explore Your Options: Aquarius NEW Moon Vibes
    by Kathy Crabbe



    Mama Moon enters the Fixed, Air sign of Aquarius on Feb. 3 at 5:03 am Pacific Time until Feb. 5 and is NEW on Feb. 4 at 1:03 pm and at Apogee (which means she’s as far away as she can be) which, in conjunction with a New Moon can lead to extreme weather conditions according to the Creative Crones Astro Diary 2019.

    It’s also Lunar IMBOLC (Northern hemisphere pagan holy day) or Lunar LAMMAS (Southern hemisphere) which is the halfway point between the Solstice and Equinox and a time of FIRSTS; either the first sign of Spring or the first Fruits Festival.

    During this oh, so significant Moon-time of firsts we also set our intentions for the moonth ahead encouraged by Mercury sextiling Jupiter and Venus entering Capricorn. Let’s GET BUSY!

    Meditate, Moon Journal and share your feeling with others. Shake it up - it’s Aquarius Time! Go deep and EXPLORE your options. Is there some piece of the puzzle missing - Why? Be brave and find out by picking a card from my Elfin Ally Oracle Deck which, by the way is coming out very soon so stay tuned! The REVEAL is below plus a Lefty Oracle and yes, please share your comments below.


    Elfin Ally Oracle Card Reveal




    Card 1: Dragonfly Delight
    Keyword: Delight
    Meaning; Take it slow for all that you need or want is at your fingertips.
    Reversed: There is a troublemaker in your life that needs to go.

    Card 2: Spirit Horse
    Keyword: Graceful
    Meaning: With great pride and joy you charge forward trusting you are on the right path.
    Reversed: You are at the crossroads, stuck and uncertain.

    Card 3: Yellow Butterfly
    Keyword: Sweet
    Meaning: Today you are taking a different path; one that is lighter and truer to your heart’s goal.
    Reversed: You are chasing dreams, not reality.


    Lefty Oracle Card for the New Moon



    Nambia, Pleasantly Present

    Mantra: I relax.


    Affirmation: I am pleasantly present and focused upon one project, and only one project at a time.


    Element: Air

    When this card appears in a reading you definitely need a break. Take some time for rest and relaxation, to shed your worries, get pampered and have some fun. This is not a time to crack down and get busy. You’ll achieve far more later by taking it easy now. Figure out an easy way to charge your batteries and make time for YOU.

    In my own life, I love to simply just sit in nature, breathe in the smells and enjoy the sights; not thinking or doing anything, just being.



    Via The Lefty Oracle Deck 






    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman University so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.
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